May 2004 Legislative Report

2003 - 2004 Sexuality Education Legislative Report
current through May 4, 2004

Alabama: SIECUS is not aware of any sexuality education related legislation in Alabama in 2003-2004.

Alaska: SIECUS is not aware of any sexuality education related legislation in Alaska in 2003-2004.

Arizona: The Arizona legislature does not carry bills over from one legislative session to the next. Both 2003 and 2004 bills are listed. Arizona's regular session ended on April 24, 2004.

Bill Requiring that Sexuality Education be Medically Accurate Died, 2004 Session

Senate Bill 1096, introduced in January 2004 and passed out of committee in February, died at the end of the legislative session in April. The bill would have required that all sex education curricula be medically accurate. It also would have specifically allowed schools to provide information on all sexually transmitted diseases, not only HIV/AIDS.

Bill Requiring Parental Opt-In Died, 2004 Session

House Bill 2189, introduced in January 2004, would have required written parental consent for a student to participate in a sex education course. The bill, which also would have prohibited presentations or instruction in sexuality in any course other than a formal sex education course without prior approval by the governing board, failed to pass committee in February 2004 and subsequently died.

Medical Accuracy Bill Died, 2003 Session

Senate Bill 1142, introduced in January 2003, would have required that any sexuality education curricula taught in schools be medically accurate. It also authorized school districts that provide instruction on HIV/AIDS to provide instruction on sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). The bill passed the Senate Education Committee on February 24, 2003 but died when the legislature went into special session.

Also of note in Arizona: In 2003, Governor Janet Napolitano (D) line-item vetoed $470,000 for an abstinence-only-until-marriage program "because, as the Goldwater Institute recently concluded, government has proven to be an ineffective communicator of the abstinence message, and because the state lottery fund is better spent elsewhere."

Arkansas: SIECUS is not aware of any sexuality education related legislation in Arkansas in 2003-2004.

California: The California legislature carried bills over from the 2003 to the 2004 session. California's regular session is scheduled to end on August 31, 2004.

Comprehensive Sexual Health and HIV/AIDS Prevention Education Bill Signed by Gov. Davis

The California Comprehensive Sexual Health and HIV/AIDS Prevention Act, Senate Bill 71, consolidates, clarifies, and amends the state's current provisions dealing with sexuality education. The bill passed the Senate on June 4 by a vote of 23 to 13, the Assembly on September 9 by a vote of 44 to 31, and was signed by Gov. Gray Davis (D) on October 2, 2003.

The act authorizes school districts to provide comprehensive sexual health education, as defined, in any kindergarten to grade 12, inclusive, and to ensure that all pupils in grades seven to 12, inclusive, receive HIV/AIDS prevention education from trained instructors, among other provisions. Current law requires school districts to teach HIV/AIDS prevention education at least once in middle school and once in high school. School districts are not required to teach sex education.

SB 71 requires that all instruction be age-appropriate and "medically accurate." The bill also requires that parents/guardians be notified about any HIV/AIDS and sexuality education class. Parents may request that their child not receive such education (a so-called "opt-out" provision). If the notification form is not returned, parental consent is assumed. The bill also encourages parent-child communication about sex.

Teen Pregnancy Prevention Bill Signed by Gov. Davis

Assembly Bill 561, introduced in February 2003 and approved by Governor Gray Davis (D) on October 1, 2003, establishes four programs within the Department of Health Services Office of Family Planning (to the extent funded) with the purpose of reducing teenage pregnancy as continuing programs.

The new law seeks to make the Male Involvement Program, the Community Challenge Grant Program, the TeenSMART Program, and the Information and Education Program continuing annual programs.

Parental Consent for Sexuality Education Requirement Died

Assembly Bill 950, introduced in February 2003, would have amended California's existing Education Code to prohibit any sexuality education instruction without a parent's prior written consent (this is called a "opt-in" provision), even for a special guest speaker or an "outside consultant." Current law prohibits sexuality education instruction unless a parent or guardian has been notified and allows school districts to require an opt-in provision. The bill also would have prohibited such instruction from "advocating drug use, a particular sexual practice, or sexual activities."

AB 950 would have contradicted SB 71 which was signed into law in 2003. The bill died in February 2004.

Bill Requiring California to Develop Abstinence-Only Program Died

The federal government provides $50 million in grants each year to states for abstinence-only-until-marriage programs. States are required to match every four dollars of federal money with three dollars of state money. California is the only state that does not take the federal government's grant for abstinence-only-until-marriage. Senate Bill 267, introduced on February 18, 2003, would require the State Department of Health Services to develop a program that would allow the state to apply for and receive the federal funds.

A hearing was held on March 26, 2003 and the bill failed to pass the committee by a vote of two to seven. The bill subsequently died in February 2004.

Bill Prohibiting Denigration of Religious Doctrine

Assembly Bill 2180, as introduced in February 2004, prohibits denigration of religious doctrines in sexuality education instruction and materials. The bill, amended in March and April, now extends such prohibition to all courses of study.

"Tolerance" Bill

Assembly Bill 2220 as introduced in February 2004 would have made technical, non-substantive changes to the state's sexuality education law. The bill was amended in March 2004 by the author to include provisions on "tolerance" and delete the state's comprehensive sexual health education law.

The bill failed to pass the Committee on Education on April 14, 2004.

Parental "Opt-Out" for Religious Purposes Bill

Senate Bill 1741, introduced Assembly Bill 2220 as introduced in February 2004 would have made technical, non-substantive changes to the state's sexuality education law. The bill was amended in April 2004 by the author to include a specific parental opt-out provision for religious purposes and delete the state's comprehensive sexual health education law. Current law contains a parental opt-out provision for any reason.

The bill failed to pass the Committee on Education on April 14, 2004.

Parental Notification for Guest Speakers on Sexuality or HIV/AIDS Bill

Assembly Bill 1925, introduced in February 2004, passed the Assembly and was sent to the Senate in April 2004. The bill would require schools to notify parents of any guest speaker who intends to speak on sexuality education or HIV/AIDS issues no fewer than 10 and no more than 15 days in advance of said presentation. Current law requires that parents be notified about any sexuality education or HIV/AIDS instruction in advance. Parents are also authorized to take their child out of such classes.

As of April 30, 2004, the Senate has not acted on this bill.

Colorado: The Colorado legislature does not carry bills over from one session to the next. Both 2003 and 2004 bills are listed. Colorado's legislative session is scheduled to end on May 5, 2004.

Bill Providing Parental "Opt-Out" Option for Sexuality Education, 2004 Session

As introduced on February 19, 2004, HB 1375 would have prohibited school districts from providing instruction relating to "sexual lifestyles that are alternative to heterosexual relationships" except in the context of risk and prevention of STDs.

The bill was amended in March 2004 to require that school districts provide written notification of any human sexuality instruction and include detailed and substantive outlines of such instruction. Further, school districts must advise parents and guardians that they may excuse their children from such instruction. All prior sections on "alternative lifestyles" were deleted.

The bill passed the House on March 26, 2004 and passed a Senate committee on April 28. The Senate must pass the bill by May 5, 2004. Otherwise, it will die at the end of the legislative session.

Abstinence Bill Died, 2004 Session

As introduced on April 13, 2004, Senate Bill 227 would have required Colorado to incorporate the federal definition of "abstinence education" into any health-related education program that included instruction on HIV/AIDS or sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).

The bill failed to pass the Senate on April 20, 2004 and subsequently died.

Joint Resolution Supporting "Pure By Choice" Rally Signed, 2004 Session

Introduced on March 2, 2004, House Joint Resolution 1025 was signed by the Speaker of the House and the President of the Senate on March 16 and March 18, respectively. The resolution supports "those youth who choose abstinence" and recognizes that "our nation is at a crossroads regarding sexual purity and the dignity of the human person, especially on college campuses."

The Pure By Choice rally was held on March 6, 2004 at the University of Denver.

Connecticut: The Connecticut legislature does not carry bills over from one session to the next. Both 2003 and 2004 bills are listed. Connecticut's regular session is scheduled to end on May 5, 2004.

Bill Requiring Child Development Education, Including "Family Life Education" Died, 2003 Session

In the Connecticut General Assembly, a bill was introduced that would, as amended, have required that child development education, including family life education among other topics, be included in school curricula. The purpose, in part, was to teach students parenting skills. House Bill 5993, introduced on January 27, 2003, and amended by the Joint Committee on Children on February 5, does not define "family life education."

The bill sat in committee until the end of the legislative session in June 2003 when it died.

Delaware: SIECUS is not aware of any sexuality education related legislation in Delaware in 2003-2004.

Federal: The Federal government carried bills over from the 2003 to the 2004 session (the 108th Congress).

Family Life Education Act

The Family Life Education Act, introduced on April 21, 2004 with 76 co-sponsors, seeks to provide $100 million in federal funding annually for five years for states to conduct programs that include "education on both abstinence and contraception for the prevention of teenage pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV/AIDS." The bill does not require states to provide a match to receive the funds.

HR 4182 provides a nine-point definition of family life education to which funded programs would be required to adhere. Among these requirements are that programs: be age appropriate and medically accurate; not teach or promote religion; teach abstinence as the only sure way to avoid pregnancy or sexually transmitted diseases; encourage family communication about sexuality between parent and child; and present the health benefits and side effects of all contraceptives. The bill provides ten percent of the overall program's budget for evaluation.

The Family Life Education Act is in the House Committee on Energy and Commerce.

The bill has served as a model for legislation in several states, including Rhode Island, Maine, Minnesota, and Washington State.

Medically Accurate Sex Education Bill

The Medically Accurate Sex Education Act, introduced in the House of Representatives on February 13, 2003, would prohibit any elementary or secondary school receiving federal funds from providing information that is not medically accurate in human development or sexuality education course material.

Medical accuracy is defined as "supported by research, recognized as accurate and objective by leading medical, psychological, psychiatric, and public health organizations and agencies, and, where relevant, published in peer-reviewed journals."

HR 802, which currently has12 co-sponsors, is in the Committee on Education and the Workforce.

Putting Prevention First Act of 2004

The bi-partisan Pro-Choice Caucus introduced the Putting Prevention First Act of 2004 on April 21, 2004. HR 4192, of which the Family Life Education Act is a component, seeks to expand access to preventative health care services and education programs in order to help reduce unintended pregnancy, the spread of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), including HIV/AIDS, and to reduce the number of abortions.

The bill, which has 96 co-sponsors, has been referred to three House committees.

Teen Pregnancy Prevention Resolution

House Concurrent Resolution 91, introduced on March 12, 2003, expresses the "sense of Congress that the Nation should strive to prevent teen pregnancy by encouraging teens to view adolescence as a time for education and growing-up and by educating teens about the negative consequences of early sexual activity."

The bill is in the House Committee on Energy and Commerce, Subcommittee on Health.

District of Columbia: SIECUS is not aware of any sexuality education related legislation in the District of Columbia in 2003-2004.

Florida: The Florida legislature does not carry bills over from one session to the next. Both 2003 and 2004 bills are listed. Florida's legislative session ended on April 30, 2004.

Bills Extending Requirement of Community Health Education Die, 2004 Session

Florida law currently requires that comprehensive health education which includes, among other things, concepts of family life and sexual abstinence be taught. HB 1047 and SB 2534, both introduced in March 2004, would have required that such education be taught at every grade level, pre-kindergarten through grade 8 for at least one semester.

Both bills died at the end of the legislative session.

AIDS Education Bill Died, 2004 Session

Senate Bill 1424, introduced in March 2004, would have required the Department of Education to award grants to public school districts to implement school-based AIDS educational activities. Criteria for selection for the competitive grants would have been based, in part, on program objectives, target population, outcome measurement, teen sexual health statistics in the area, and qualifications of personnel.

The bill died with the end of the legislative session in May 2004.

2003 Bill Requiring AIDS Education Grants Died, 2003 Session

Senate Bill 1262, introduced on March 3, 2003, would have required the Department of Education to award annual grants to public school districts for the purpose of implementing AIDS education activities. AIDS education is not currently mandatory in Florida. This bill would have provided an incentive for such education.

The bill passed the Education Committee, but died in the Committee on Health, Aging, and Long-Term Care on May 2, 2003 as the Florida legislature does not carry bills over to the next session.

"Parenting Skills" Included in High School Graduation Requirements Signed by Gov. Bush, 2003 Session

Senate Bill 30A, introduced in a Special Session on May 12, 2003 and signed by Governor Bush (R) on June 9, 2003, includes "parenting skills" as part of the life-management skills course required for high school graduation. This is the same course that includes instruction on HIV/STD prevention and abstinence.

Georgia: SIECUS is not aware of any sexuality education related legislation in Georgia in 2003-2004.

Hawaii: The Hawaii legislature carried bills over from the 2003 to the 2004 session. Hawaii's legislative session is scheduled to end on May 6, 2004.

Bills Requiring Medically Accurate, Comprehensive Sexuality Education

Two bills, both introduced in 2003, would have required recipients of state funding who provide sexuality education to provide medically accurate, age-appropriate information about both abstinence and contraception. House Bill 136 and Senate Bill 876 died at the end of Hawaii's legislative session.

House Bill 872, introduced on January 22, 2003, includes findings that comprehensive sexuality education-education discussing abstinence and contraception helps delay the onset of sexual activity and reduce the frequency of sex, and that abstinence-only programs do not delay the onset of sexual activity or the frequency of sex. The bill required the Board of Education to formulate a policy requiring that schools teach comprehensive, medically accurate sexuality education.

Idaho: SIECUS is not aware of any sexuality education related legislation in Idaho in 2003-2004.

Illinois: The Illinois legislature carried bills over from the 2003 to the 2004 session. Illinois' legislature meets throughout the year.

Comprehensive Sexuality Education Bill Died

Senate Bill 99, introduced on January 29, 2003, would have amended Illinois' current Education Code to require that all sexuality education taught be comprehensive and medically accurate and include instruction on the prevention of sexually transmitted diseases as well as HIV/AIDS. The language changes included an emphasis on the effectiveness of abstinence, but the phrase "abstinence is the expected norm" was deleted. Language promoting heterosexual marriage was also omitted from current code in the bill, and other changes were included. The bill passed a Senate committee on March 6, 2003 but subsequently died.

Requirement that Students be Taught About Safe Surrender Law and Adoption Signed

House Bill 2298, introduced on February 19, 2003, and signed by Governor Rod Blagojevich (D) on July 2, 2003, requires that students in sex education classes be advised of the provisions of the Abandoned Newborn Infant Protection Act, a so-called "safe surrender" law. An amendment to the bill added a provision that information about parenting skills and confidential adoption services also be required under the law.

Hispanic/Latino Teen Pregnancy Prevention and Intervention Initiative Adopted

House Bill 1630, the Hispanic/Latino Teen Pregnancy Prevention and Intervention Initiative passed the House on March 20 and the Senate on May 9. It was adopted on August 12, 2003. The Department of Human Services will establish the program.

Indiana: The Indiana legislature does not carry bills over from one session to the next. Both 2003 and 2004 bills are listed. Indiana's session ended on March 4, 2004.

Bill Requiring Instruction on "Health Consequences" of Abortion Died, 2004 session

Senate Bill 84, introduced in December 2003, would have required that high school health curricula include instruction on fetal development, including "photographic images portraying each stage of uterine fetal development" and the health consequences of pregnancy termination.

The bill died at the end of the legislative session.

Sexuality Education Bills Died, 2003 Session

House Bill 1199, introduced on January 8, 2003, would have added a requirement to current sexuality education law that any program must "include instruction on maintaining self-control, resisting peer pressure, and establishing positive relationships in preparation for marriage." Current law has three other requirements: 1) that the program teach abstinence from sexual activity outside of marriage as the expected standard for all school age children, 2) that the program include that abstinence from sexual activity is the only certain way to avoid out-of-wedlock pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases, and other associated health problems, and 3) that the program include that the best way to avoid sexually transmitted diseases and other associated health problems is to establish a mutually faithful monogamous relationship in the context of marriage.

House Bill 1862, introduced on January 23, 2003, would have required that when health, AIDS, HIV, or abstinence education is required by statute, all information taught be medically accurate. The bill did not strike out current abstinence or marriage promotion language from the statutes and left the above three requirements in current law.

Iowa: The Iowa legislature only carries bills over if they have passed both the House and the Senate. Both 2003 and 2004 bills are listed. Iowa's legislative session ended on April 20, 2004.

Bill Requiring that Sexuality Education be Medically Accurate, Age Appropriate Died, 2003 Session

House Bill 465, introduced in March 2003, would have required that all family life courses be medically accurate and age appropriate. Further, the Department of Education would have had to make such courses available for schools and develop a procedure for evaluating all such courses. All courses would have been required to teach several topics, among them presentations of the side effects, benefits, success and failure rates of all forms of contraception, and communication skills.

The bill died in April 2003 at the end of the legislative session.

Kansas: SIECUS is not aware of any sexuality education related legislation in Kansas in 2003-2004.

Kentucky: The Kentucky legislature does not carry bills over from one session to the next. Both 2003 and 2004 bills are listed. Kentucky's legislative session ended on April 13, 2004.

Bill Limiting Participation in Programs Where Birth Control Discussed Died, 2004 Session

House Bill 31, introduced in January 2004, would have prohibited a "state organizational unit or administrative body" from providing or participating in an educational program in which information on birth control is provided with a pro-choice view unless equal time was given to the pro-life point of view.

The bill died at the end of the legislative session in April 2004.

Louisiana: The Louisiana legislature does not carry bills over from one session to the next. Both 2003 and 2004 bills are listed. Louisiana's regular session is scheduled to end on June 21, 2004.

Bill Requiring Parenthood Education, 2004 Session

House Bill 74, introduced in March 2004, would require that all high schools offer instruction in parenthood education as a requirement for graduation. The bill is in committee. The same bill (HB 103) was introduced in 2003 and died at the end of the 2003 legislative session.

"Adoption Awareness" Requirement in Family Life Courses, 2004 Session

Senate Bill 740, introduced in March 2004, would require that adoption awareness be taught in any middle or high school courses which discuss family life topics. "Adoption awareness" as defined in the bill means "specific instruction on the benefits of adoption for families wishing to add a child, for potential adoptees, and for persons who are pregnant or who have a child that they are unable to care for."

The bill passed the Senate on April 21, 2004.

Parenthood Education Requirement Bill Died, 2003 Session

House Bill 103, pre-filed on February 19, 2003, would have created a parenthood education requirement for all public secondary schools. Current law states that if a school teaches home economics, it must also teach parenthood education. This bill sought to require all public high schools to teach parenthood education regardless of whether they teach home economics.

The bill died at the end of the 2003 legislative session.

Maine: SIECUS is not aware of any sexuality education related legislation in Maine in 2003-2004.

Maryland: The Maryland legislature does not carry bills over from one session to the next. Both 2003 and 2004 bills are listed. Maryland's legislative session ended on April 12, 2004.

Bill Limiting Sexuality Education, Requiring Parental Consent Died, 2003 Session

House Bill 1169 died in the Maryland House of Delegates Committee on Ways and Means on March 21, 2003. HB 1169 would have prohibited any County Board of Education from adopting curricula that "promotes the distribution of contraceptives," required parental consent for sexuality education courses (a parental "opt-in" requirement), and prohibited school health services without parental consent.

Massachusetts: The Massachusetts legislature carried bills over from the 2003 to the 2004 session. Massachusetts' legislature meets throughout the year.

Health Education Requirement

House Bill 1258 and Senate Bill 295, both introduced in January 2003, would require that health education be taught in grades kindergarten through 12 by adding the requirement to the state's core curriculum. The definition of "health education" comes from the Massachusetts Comprehensive Health Education Framework and includes information on topics such as nutrition, physical activity, mental health, safety and injury prevention, reproduction and sexuality, substance abuse, violence prevention, and consumer health.

Another bill introduced in the House, HB 2037, contains the same language as the above bills. HB 2037 also includes language on other instruction to be included on topics such as history, AIDS education, and violence prevention, among others, and specifically gives the board the authority to include the "teaching of family life skills."

A hearing on all three bills was held on September 18 and all three bills were "set aside" in March 2004. They are not expected to move again.

HIV/AIDS Prevention Education Requirement

Senate Bill 293, House Bill 1847, and House Bill 2753 would include HIV/AIDS prevention education in the health education curriculum of all public schools. All three bills were introduced on January 1, 2003 and are in committee.

A hearing on all three bills was held on September 18 and all three bills were "set aside" in March 2004. They are not expected to move again.

Community-Based Health and Sexuality Education Services

House Bill 1867 and Senate Bill 550, both introduced in January 2003, would require the state to establish community-based health and sexuality education services provided by comprehensive family planning agencies.

A hearing was held on July 16 for both bills and they came out of the Joint Committee on Health Care on February 4, 2004. As of April 30, 2004, the bills are in the House Committee on Ways and Means.

Health Educational Curriculum Committee Requirement

House Bill 323, filed in December 2002 and in committee since January 1, would require every public school district to establish a Health Educational Curriculum Committee to "research and make recommendations on a comprehensive, age appropriate, factually and medically accurate health education curriculum for grades k-12." The bill also contains provisions relating to parental notification and parental opt-out policies.

A hearing was held on September 18, 2003 and the bill was "set aside." It is not expected to move again.

Bills Requiring Parental Notification for Sexuality Education

House Bills 1445 and 2757, both introduced in January 2003, would require that any school with a sexuality education program have a written policy on parental/guardian notification of the program. All such programs would also have to be non-mandatory elective programs and parents would have to give written permission, or permission by a method similar to those used for other elective courses, for their children to participate.

A hearing was held on September 18, 2003 and the bills were "set aside." They are not expected to move again.

Bill Establishing Pregnancy Prevention Program Based on Unwed Mothers

House Bill 1115, for which a hearing was scheduled in April 2003, would direct several departments to hire, train, and prepare unwed mothers who have received certain aid to take part in a pilot program for girls and/or boys to "educate them as to the adverse social and economic consequences of being an unwed mother." The bill also establishes an evaluation component for different types of pregnancy prevention programs.

The bill came out of committee in February 2004 and, as of April 2004, is in the House Committee on Ways and Means.

Michigan: The Michigan legislature carried bills over from the 2003 to the 2004 session. Michigan's legislature meets throughout the year.

Bills Strengthening Abstinence Requirements

On April 27, 2004, the Michigan Senate approved SB 943 and SB 944, originally introduced in February 2004. The bills are intended to "strengthen" current abstinence laws by requiring schools to "stress" abstinence until marriage, teach "medically accurate" information on HIV/AIDS, and stress that abstinence is an effective method of preventing "unplanned or out-of-wedlock pregnancy and sexually transmitted disease." The bills also establish a formal process for parents to report schools not in compliance, give the state the authority to withhold one percent of a school's funding for noncompliance, and establish guidelines for a health education advisory board. While current law established that "family planning drugs or devices" cannot be distributed in a public school, SB 943 expands the prohibition to all public school property.

The bills have been sent to the House where related bills HB 5477 and HB 5478 were introduced in February 2004.

New Law Requires Inclusion of Legal Consequences of Sex in Sex Education Curriculum

An amendment to Michigan's school aid act requires that all school districts with sex education courses include information in the curricula on the legal consequences of having sex with a minor. In the state, having sex or sexual contact with a minor under the age of 16 is a crime punishable by up to three years imprisonment. This is true even if the sexual contact is consensual. If convicted, the person's name will also be listed on the state's sex offender registry for at least 25 years. School districts that do not follow the new law could lose five percent of their state aid.

The new law took effect on October 1, 2003.

Requirement for Medically Accurate Sex Education

House Bill 4646, introduced on May 6, 2003 and referred to the Committee on Education, would require that school boards provide instruction in medically accurate, age appropriate, comprehensive sexuality education for all grade levels. Further, any instruction on disease prevention must be factually and medically accurate. The bill requires that teacher training and curricula choice be controlled by local boards rather than state boards and that public hearings be held for any proposed curricula changes, including abstinence-based changes.

Parenting Education Requirement

House Bill 4101, introduced on January 29, 2003, would require that "life management" be taught to children starting in kindergarten. Life management is defined as parenting education, intended to teach children about the responsibilities of parenthood. If such instruction includes any sexuality education, it must be submitted to and approved by the sex education advisory board.

Bill Would Make Sexuality Education Elective, Delete Parental Opt-Out Provision

House Bill 5359, introduced in December 2003, would make sexuality education courses elective and not a requirement for graduation. The bill also deletes language creating a parental opt-out provision but maintains that parents must be notified and given an opportunity to review materials used in the course.

Resolution Recognizing Work of Crisis Pregnancy Centers

Michigan House Resolution 167, introduced in November 2003 and reported out of the House Committee on Health Policy in February 2004, urges Congress and the State of Michigan to provide assistance to crisis pregnancy centers. The resolution recognizes that "many pregnancy care centers across the country also offer classes in abstinence education, including programs carried out in schools."

Resolution Urging Public Universities to Examine Classes on Sexuality

House Resolution 141, introduced in October 2003, urges "Michigan's public universities to reexamine all class offerings and refrain from offering classes or university-sanctioned activities that promote or facilitate participation in a sexual lifestyle or practices other than heterosexual monogamy."

The bill was offered in response to a class called "How to be Gay: Male Homosexuality and Initiation" offered at a state university.

Minnesota: The Minnesota legislature carried bills over from the 2003 to the 2004 session. Minnesota's legislative session is scheduled to end on May 17, 2004.

Abstinence-Until-Marriage Mandate Dropped from Omnibus Education Bill

Current law in Minnesota requires a "comprehensive, technically accurate, and updated curriculum that includes helping students to abstain from sexual activity until marriage." Efforts from the House to change the requirement to an abstinence-only-until-marriage curriculum in the omnibus education bill (HF 1404 and SF 1528) adopted by the legislature were not successful in the Senate or the conference. However, funding for the state's five kindergarten through grade 12 HIV/STI regional training sites was cut in the bill.

HF 765 and SF 851 were incorporated into the Senate version of the omnibus bill but not accepted in the conference. Those bills would have made several changes to the current statute regarding sexually transmitted disease programs. The current language of "sexually transmitted infections and diseases" would have been changed to "sexually transmitted infections" and language regarding marriage in the context of abstinence would have been deleted from the current statute (which would have then read "comprehensive, technically accurate, and updated curriculum that includes helping students to abstain from sexual activity").

HF 580 and SF 747, requiring every school district to offer two curricula to address HIV/STI prevention-one comprehensive sexual health education curricula and one abstinence-until-marriage curricula-were incorporated into the House version of the omnibus bill. The Senate version did not include this requirement, and conferees ultimately decided to drop the different requirements, thus maintaining the current law.

Also of note were proposed amendments that would have included language prohibiting any state agency or school from "promoting homosexuality."

The House amendment was ultimately withdrawn and the Senate amendment failed.

Abstinence-Until-Marriage Requirement Proposed

House Bill 1227, introduced on March 26, 2003, is intended to "improve student access to services that support academic success." The bill was amended in committee to include new provisions, one of which states that if school districts comply with a state statute regarding a sexually transmitted disease program, then they must provide students with a curriculum and instruction on abstinence-until-marriage.

A committee report was adopted on April 7 incorporating the amendments and the bill was re-referred to another committee where it has been since April 2003.

Comprehensive Family Life and Sexuality Education Requirement Proposed

Senate Bill 1665 and House Bill 2731, introduced in February and March 2004, respectively would require that all school districts provide comprehensive family life and sexuality education in grades kindergarten through 12 by the 2008-2009 school year. In addition, the bills would establish regional training sites for comprehensive family planning and sexuality education, create a grant program for after-school enrichment programs, require referrals and distribution of family planning and contraception information after abortion services are provided, require development of a family planning website, and make changes to the MN ENABL (Education Now And Babies Later) program.

Substantially similar bills introduced and in committee are SB 2658, SB 2659, SB 2660, SB 2661, SB 2662, and SB 2673.

House Bill 2546 and Senate Bills 2443 and 2444, also introduced in February 2004 and March 2004, make similar requirements on school districts. These bills, with slight differences, would allow schools to create comprehensive, medically accurate, age-appropriate family life and sexuality programs for their pupils in kindergarten through sixth grade and would require such programs for students in grades seven through 12. The bills provide a parental opt-out provision and makes requirements about parental notification of such courses. SB 2443 was slightly amended (but does not differ from this description) and passed in committee on March 11, 2004.

Health Education Requirement Proposed

House Bill 2209 and Senate Bill 1882, introduced in February 2004 and currently in committee, would create a requirement of at least 50 hours of health education annually for Minnesota students. A provision requiring the commissioner to define health education through rulemaking is also included.

Mississippi: The Mississippi legislature does not carry bills over from one session to the next. Both 2003 and 2004 bills are listed. Mississippi's legislative session is scheduled to end on May 9, 2004.

Governor Approves Bill Without Provision Requiring Creation of Advisory Councils to Make Recommendations on Sexuality Education, 2003 Session

After a January 17, 2003 introduction, House Bill 920, which would have required local school districts to create health/physical education advisory councils to make recommendations on various topics, including age-appropriate sexuality education, died in committee on February 4. A similar bill, Senate Bill 2339, was introduced in the Senate on January 15 and passed on February 6. It was then sent to the House where it was amended on February 21 to omit any reference to human sexuality and passed on February 26. Governor Ronnie Musgrove (D) approved the bill on March 18, 2003.

Bill Requiring Informed Consent for Sex Education Died, 2004 Session

The Student and Family Privacy Protection Act, introduced in January 2004, died in committee in March 2004. Senate Bill 2111, among other provisions, would have required informed written consent from parents before a child could participate in any "health, sex education or similar subjects." Informed consent for student health care services also would have been required as would, upon request, availability of all instruction materials for inspection by a parent. Any survey that asked a student about their sexual attitudes, beliefs, or behaviors, among other things, would have been prohibited.

Missouri: The Missouri legislature does not carry bills over from one legislative session to the next. Both 2003 and 2004 bills are listed. Missouri's legislative session is scheduled to end on May 30, 2004.

Bill Establishing Abstinence Program for Low-Income Pregnant Women, Mothers, and Children, 2004 Session

House Bill 1526, introduced in February 2004, would establish a program to provide preventative and primary health care services to low-income pregnant women, mothers, and children that "promotes responsible sexual behavior" by "teaching abstinence from sexual activity outside marriage" and also promotes "childbirth over abortion." The bill contains the federal government's eight-point definition of abstinence education. Groups that "promote abstinence" are given specific preference for receiving grants from the program.

Bill Establishing Abstinence First Pregnancy Prevention Program, 2004 Session

House Bill 1768, introduced on April 29, 2004, would establish an "Abstinence First Pregnancy Prevention Program" to "teach responsible behavior to students in the public schools." The program would have to emphasize the "100 percent effectiveness of abstinence."

Montana: SIECUS is not aware of any sexuality education related bills in Montana in 2003-2004.

Nebraska: The Nebraska legislature carried bills over from the 2003 to the 2004 session. Nebraska's legislative session ended on April 15, 2004.

Governor Signs Bill Repealing Law that Required Distribution of Information about Abortion Rights to Students

Since 1991, Nebraska state law has required that public schools inform students in grades seven through 12 about the state's parental notification law and how minors can be exempted from the requirement through judicial bypass. In January 2003, state Senator Mike Foley introduced a bill to repeal that law.

The Nebraska Legislature is a unicameral body. The Constitution of the state requires that a bill be voted on at least twice in the body of the legislature before being sent to the Governor. On January 13, 2004 the legislature voted 38-4 to approve the bill after a filibuster attempt by Senator Ernie Chambers failed. On February 5, 2004, the legislature again approved the bill, this time by 35-4, after a failed attempt to amend the bill. On March 25, the bill was passed and sent to Gov. Mike Johanns (R), who signed it on March 31, 2004.

Nevada: SIECUS is not aware of any sexuality education related legislation in Nevada in 2003-2004.

New Hampshire: SIECUS is not aware of any sexuality education related legislation in New Hampshire in 2003-2004.

New Jersey: The New Jersey legislature carries bills over from even to odd years (2002 to 2003 and 2004 to 2005). All related bills since 2002 are listed. New Jersey's legislature meets throughout the year.

Comprehensive Family Life Education Bill, 2002 and 2004 Sessions

On May 9, 2002, a bill was introduced in the New Jersey legislature that would require each board of education in the state to offer comprehensive family life education. HB 2272 defines family life education as "education regarding human development and sexuality, including education on family planning and sexually transmitted diseases, that is medically accurate and age-appropriate; respects community values and encourages parental communication; promotes responsible sexual behavior and addresses both abstinence and the use of contraception; promotes individual responsibility and involvement regarding sexuality; and teaches skills for responsible decision-making regarding sexuality."

The bill died at the end of the legislative session in December 2003.

The same bill was again introduced in the current session. House Bill 787, introduced in January 2004, would make the same requirements for family life education and also repeal the New Jersey law requiring that all such courses stress that abstinence is the only completely reliable means for eliminating STDs and avoiding pregnancy.

Bill to Exempt Students from Family Life Education Requirements in Public Institutions of Higher Education, 2003 and 2004 Sessions

House Bill 3806, introduced on June 16, 2003, would excuse any student with "conflicts of conscience" from certain class requirements in public institutions of higher education. The enumerated classes are "health, family life education, or sexual education." Such a law already exists for students in public elementary or secondary schools.

House Bill 308, introduced in January 2004, and Senate Bill 1244, introduced in February 2004, contain the same provisions.

Parenting Education Part of Family Life Education, 2004 Session

Introduced in January 2004, House Bill 1525 would require that instruction on parenting, including responsibilities and obligations, be included in any family life education course.

New Mexico: The New Mexico legislature does not carry bills over from one legislative session to the next. Both 2003 and 2004 bills are listed. New Mexico's legislative session ended on February 19, 2004.

Medically Accurate, Age-Appropriate Sexuality Education Bill Died, 2003 Session

The Health and Human Development Education Act, House Bill 554, was introduced on February 5, 2003 and passed the House on February 25 by a vote of 61 to 2. A bill report was then adopted by the Senate Committee on Education on March 18, 2003. The bill died at the end of the legislative session after the Senate took no action.

HB 554 would have required the Department of Education to create guidelines for schools on age-appropriate health and human development courses for grades kindergarten through 12. While schools are currently required to provide health education, such instruction may be taught as a separate class or as part of the curriculum for other subjects. This legislation outlined different guidelines for grades kindergarten through four, grades five through eight, and grades nine through 12.

Under the legislation, the Department of Education would also have been required to provide "medically accurate health and human development information" to districts.

New York: The New York legislature carried bills over from the 2003 to the 2004 session. New York's legislature meets throughout the year.

Age Appropriate, Medically Accurate Comprehensive Sex Education Grant Program Proposed

House Bill 8599, introduced on May 21, 2003 and Senate Bill 7201, introduced on April 28, 2004, would establish an age-appropriate sexuality education grant program with the intent of providing "at-risk adolescents with the information, assistance, skills and support to enable them to make responsible decisions, including abstaining from sexual intercourse and for those who do become sexually active, the use of condoms or contraceptives effectively." The bill outlines the parameters of such programs, including that they must be medically accurate and provide information on contraceptives. The bill provides $20 million for this program in its first year with increasing dollar amounts for subsequent years.

Dignity for All Students Act

The Dignity for All Students Act, Assembly Bill 1118 and Senate Bill 1925, introduced on January 14, 2003 and February 14, 2003, respectively, would direct each school district, with direction from the Commissioner on Education, to establish policies, create programs, and develop instruction intended to eradicate discrimination in public schools based on various factors, including sexual orientation.

The Assembly bill passed on March 8, 2004. The Senate bill is in committee.

Bill to Protect LGBT Youth

House Bill 7199, introduced on March 24, 2003, would require training on lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex issues (LGBT) for employees of facilities operated by the Office of Children and Family Services. The purpose of the bill is to protect LGBT youth in such facilities from harassment, discrimination, and abuse and to increase tolerance and diversity. The bill is in response to evidence demonstrating that such youth often face harassment, discrimination, and violence in the Office of Children and Family Services facilities.

Bill to Expand Eligibility for Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention and Services

House Bill 4631, introduced on February 19, 2003, would expand the definition of "eligible adolescent" in the adolescent pregnancy prevention and services act to extend benefits to more young people.

Bill Prohibiting Instruction on "Alternative Relationships"

House Bill 10141, introduced in March 2004, would prohibit "instruction relating to sexual lifestyles that are alternative to heterosexual relationships, including but not limited to homosexual relationships, except in the context of instruction concerning the risk and prevention of sexually transmitted disease."

North Carolina: The North Carolina legislature carried bills over from one legislative session to the next only if they have passed their House of origin. All related 2003 and 2004 bills are listed. North Carolina's legislative session is scheduled to end in July 2004.

Medical Accuracy Bills Die at End of Session in House and Senate, 2003 Session

House Bill 873, introduced on April 7, 2003, and Senate Bill 618, introduced on March 31, 2003, would have required that health education courses offered in public schools with public funds, including abstinence-only-until-marriage programs, provide medically and factually accurate information that is age-appropriate. The bills would have required that abstinence be taught and that the latest available statistics on the success and failure rates of contraceptive methods, including condoms, be taught.

Bills only carry over to the next session if they have passed their House of origin. Neither of these bills passed a chamber and, therefore, died at the end of the 2003 session.

Bills to Restore Funding for Pregnancy Prevention Initiatives Die, 2003 Session

Senate Bill 778 and House Bill 1226, both introduced in April 2003, would have restored some funding for local teen pregnancy prevention initiatives, local health department initiatives for prevention of out-of-wedlock births, and grant-in-aid.

Bills only carry over to the next session if they have passed their House of origin. Neither of these bills passed a chamber and, therefore, died at the end of the 2003 session.

North Dakota: The North Dakota legislature does not carry bills over from one session to the next. Both 2003 and 2004 bills are listed. North Dakota does not have a regular session in 2004.

Abstinence Bill Died, 2003 Session

House Bill 1398, introduced on January 20, 2003, failed to pass the House by a vote of 50 to 43 on February 17, 2003. The bill would have required that abstinence be stressed in sexuality education courses throughout the state. The bill also would have forbidden condom or other contraceptive demonstrations.

Lubbock, Texas was cited by a North Dakota Democrat as a reason why the legislation should be defeated. Lubbock has received national attention because of its abstinence-only-until-marriage curriculum and high teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted disease rates.

Ohio: SIECUS is not aware of any sexuality education related legislation in Ohio in 2003-2004.

Oklahoma: The Oklahoma legislature carried bills over from the 2003 to the 2004 session. Oklahoma's legislative session is scheduled to end on May 28, 2004.

Act for Coordination of Efforts for Prevention of Adolescent Pregnancy and Sexually Transmitted Diseases

The Act for Coordination of Efforts for Prevention of Adolescent Pregnancy and Sexually Transmitted Diseases, House Bill 1104, was introduced on February 2 and passed committee on February 18, 2003.

The purpose of the bill is to provide for a comprehensive, coordinated, multidisciplinary and inter-agency effort to reduce the rate of adolescent pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases. The bill would create a committee for this purpose and enumerates activities for the committee. These activities include evaluating successful programs from around the country and recommending legislative changes. The bill also outlines qualifications and representatives who should serve on the board.

Oregon: SIECUS is not aware of any sexuality education related legislation in Oregon in 2003-2004.

Pennsylvania: SIECUS is not aware of any sexuality education related legislation in Pennsylvania in 2003-2004.

Rhode Island: The Rhode Island legislature carried bills over from the 2003 to the 2004 session. Rhode Island's legislative session is scheduled to end in late June 2004.

Age-Appropriate, Medically Accurate Comprehensive Sexuality Education Bills

Senate Bill 863 and House Bill 6070, both introduced in February 2003, would require that all public school students in grades one through 12 receive age-appropriate, medically accurate sexuality education. The bills require that such education stress abstinence "while not ignoring those young people who have had or are having sexual intercourse," provide information about contraceptives, and encourage family communication, among other provisions.

Bill Requiring Comprehensive Sexuality Education

Introduced in January and February 2004, HB 7304 and SB 2316 would require that all students in grades one through 12 receive instruction in human development and sexuality.

The bills follow the guidelines in the federal Family Life Education Act (H.R. 4182). As in FLEA, instruction must include information on family planning and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) that is age-appropriate, medically accurate, culturally sensitive, and respectful of community values. Instruction must stress abstinence while also not ignoring those young people who have had sexual intercourse. Information on contraceptives, family communication, and negotiation skills must be included.

South Carolina: SIECUS is not aware of any sexuality education related bills in South Carolina in 2003-2004.

South Dakota: SIECUS is not aware of any sexuality education related bills in South Dakota in 2003-2004.

Tennessee: SIECUS is not aware of any sexuality education related bills in Tennessee in 2003-2004.

Texas: The Texas legislature does not carry bills over from one session to the next. Both 2003 and 2004 bills are listed. The Texas legislature does not have a regular session in 2004.

Virtues Education Program Signed by Governor, 2003 Session

House Concurrent Resolution 73, signed by Governor Rick Perry (R) on June 22, 2003, directs the Texas Education Agency and the State Board of Education to adopt and promote a "virtues education program." The resolution outlines various components of what the program will include such as citizenship, faith, friendliness, and purity, among many others. "Promiscuity" and "teenage pregnancies" are also mentioned.

Utah: The Utah legislature does not carry bills over from one session to the next. Both 2003 and 2004 bills are listed. Utah's legislative session ended on March 3, 2004.

Civic and Character Education Bill Signed by Governor, 2004 Session

House Bill 22, signed by Governor Olene Walker (R), on March 19, 2004, requires that "character and civic education" be integrated and taught in connection with regular school curricula. Under the new law, the State Board of Education is required to establish curriculum requirements with instruction in community and personal health, physiology, personal hygiene, and the prevention of communicable disease. Instruction must "stress the importance of abstinence from all sexual activity before marriage and fidelity after marriage as methods for preventing certain communicable diseases and personal skills that encourage individual choice of abstinence and fidelity."

Vermont: The Vermont legislature carried bills over from the 2003 to the 2004 session. Vermont's legislative session is scheduled to end in early May 2004.

Bill Requiring Parental Consent for Discussion of Sexual Issues

Vermont House Bill 291, introduced on February 25, 2003, would prohibit the teaching of enumerated sexual issues to students in grades seven through 12 in public schools without written consent, for each day that one of the subjects will be discussed, of a parent or guardian. Further, the bill has a detailed notification procedure for parents including the date and time of instruction, the instructor's name, and a detailed description of the instruction to be given. The bill also prohibits the teaching of any of the enumerated subjects-among them homosexuality-to children in grades kindergarten through six.

Virginia: The Virginia legislature carries some bills over from one session to the next (decided in committee). Both 2003 and 2004 bills are listed. Virginia's regular session ended on March 16, 2004.

Medically Accurate Sexuality Education Bill Died, 2004 Session

House Bill 1273, introduced on January 16, 2004, would have required that all materials used for family life curricula in Virginia be "designed to provide medically and factually accurate and objective information." In February the bill was reported out of the Committee on Education and it was considered on the floor on February 9. During debate, Republicans argued that the bill was "unnecessary" while Del. Kristen Amundson, who sponsored the bill, said "We have people who are presenting information that is at best outdated and in some cases just flat wrong, and in some cases I think it's dangerous to kids' health."

The bill was defeated 55-35 in February 2004.

Bill Requiring Instruction on EC Significantly Amended and Sent to Governor

House Bill 1015, introduced in January 2004 and originally intended to require instruction on "the use of emergency contraception in response to sexual assault" in family life education courses, was amended on the House floor in February to instead require information on "steps to take to avoid sexual assault," the availability of counseling, and the importance of immediate medical attention after a sexual assault. All references to emergency contraception were deleted. As amended, the bill passed the House on February 12 and was sent to the Senate.

In the Senate, amendments were made but the House did not accept them. The Senate receded from its amendment and the bill was sent to the Governor.

Washington: The Washington legislature carried bills over from the 2003 to the 2004 session. Washington's legislative session ended on March 11, 2004.

Medically Accurate Sexuality Education Bills Die

Bills requiring that sexuality education paid for with public funds be medically accurate were introduced in both the House and Senate. House Bill 1178, introduced in January 2003, was amended in February and passed the House on March 7, 2003. Amendments to the original bill included clarifying that school districts are able to determine which type of curriculum to use and specifically recognizing that abstinence-only curriculum must be medically accurate. The bill was then sent to committee in the Senate but returned to a House committee without further action. The House committee reintroduced the bill by resolution in early June 2003 but no further action was taken.

The House bill recognized the importance of medically and factually accurate information about sexuality, pregnancy, and sexually transmitted diseases to the health of young people and required that any program paid for with public funds teach only medically and factually accurate information. The bill required that courses teach abstinence as the most effective way to prevent unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases, but stipulated that school districts have the discretion to choose what curriculum to use as long as it is medically accurate. The House bill also stipulated that any discussion of success or failure rates of contraceptives in any program, including abstinence-only programs, among other topics, must use medically accurate information.

Senate Bill 5314, introduced in January 2003, required that all sexuality education be medically accurate. SB 5314 is the same as HB 1178 was before it was amended in February 2003. No further action was taken and both bills died at the end of the legislative session.

"Truth in Describing Sex Education Act" Died

In January 2004 the "Truth in Describing Sex Education Act" was introduced "to help parents clearly identify the type of legislation being taught, assist community committee members in selecting the best materials to comply with school district policy, and support teachers in complying with their school district policy."

House Bill 2748 provided the federal government's definition of "abstinence education" and mandated that all school districts decide whether their sexuality education programs fit within that definition and are thus "abstinence education" or whether they "describe sexual behaviors not included in the definition" and are thus "comprehensive sex education" programs.

The bill died at the end of the legislative session.

Comprehensive, Medically Accurate Sexuality Education Bills Die

Senate Bill 6431, the Health Information for Youth Act, was introduced with bi-partisan support on January 20, 2004. It stated that all students receiving health instruction that is in some way paid for with public funds may receive "health information and disease prevention instruction." According to the bill, such instruction includes medically and scientifically accurate information that is age-appropriate, encourages family communication, states that abstinence is the only sure way to prevent pregnancy and reduce the risk of sexually transmitted disease, stresses abstinence while also addressing the health needs of sexually active students, and provides information about contraceptives and barrier methods.

Additionally, the legislation required the Washington State Department of Health (DOH) to work with the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) to develop comprehensive sexuality education guidelines for health information and disease prevention for publicly-funded schools. This would provide educators with sexuality education guidelines from the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction.

The bill was sponsored by Republican State Senator Shirley Winsley (R-Fircrest) and co-sponsored by 13 Republican and Democratic senators.

The bill passed the Committee on Health and Long Term Care on February 5, 2004 by a unanimous vote of 7 to 0, but later died when it was referred to the Senate Committee on Education.

A companion bill, House Bill 2789, was introduced in the House on January 20, 2004. This bill was sponsored by a bipartisan group of 21 representatives.

Family Preservation Education Program Died

Senate Bill 5603, introduced on January 31, 2003, seeks to strengthen family communication and relationship skills by requiring that each school district's board of directors develop and adopt a family preservation education program curricula. Under the legislation, a model curricula would be developed by the superintendent of public instruction and the board of directors could choose to accept that curricula or develop its own and submit it for approval.

The original bill stated that each student would be required to participate unless a parent or guardian excused him/her, also known as an "opt-out" provision. That was amended on February 5, 2004 to make the class available, but not required, to high school students.

The bill, as amended, passed the Senate Committee on Education on February 5, 2004 and the Rules Committee on February 11 but died at the end of the legislative session.

West Virginia: The West Virginia legislature carries bills over from one session to the next only upon request and from an odd to an even year. West Virginia's legislative session ended on March 21, 2004.

Responsible Sexuality Education in Schools Act Died

House Bill 2907, the Responsible Sexuality Education in Schools Act, was introduced on February 7, 2003. In its findings, the bill recognizes that comprehensive sexuality education-education that discusses abstinence and contraception-helps delay the onset of sexual activity, reduces the frequency of sex, and reduces the number of sex partners and that abstinence-only programs do not delay onset of sexual activity or frequency of sex.

The bill died at the end of the 2004 legislative session.

Bill Requiring Fetal Development Instruction Died

House Bill 4533, introduced in February 2004, would have required that each middle school and high school require a curriculum that teaches fetal development. A criminal fine was also prescribed for violations.

The bill died at the end of the 2004 legislative session.

Wisconsin: The Wisconsin legislature carries bills over from one session to the next. Wisconsin's legislature meets throughout the year but the regular session ended on March 25, 2004. All bills that did not pass by March 25 died.

Sexuality Education Bill Died

Assembly Substitute Amendment 1 to Assembly Bill 387 was offered on October 6, 2003 in the Committee on Education. AB 387, introduced on June 5, 2003, would have made changes to "human growth and development" curricula in the state. While a school board may now include instruction in "discouragement of adolescent sexual activity," the bill would provide instead for promotion of abstinence as "the safest and best choice for pupils, and to include accurate information on family planning on contraception." Also, while a school board can now provide instruction in HIV and AIDS, this would authorize instruction in all sexually transmitted diseases. The bill also addresses instruction relating to sexual exploitation, acquaintance rape, and legal consequences of sex with a minor and provisions about parent-child communication related to sexuality.

The amendment, offered on October 6 with a hearing held on October 7, would make small changes to the bill. The first would make clear that "medically" accurate information should be given on family planning and contraception rather than simply "accurate." The amendment also changes language to "comprehensive, medically accurate instruction in human sexuality" rather than just "human sexuality" and includes contraception in a list of topics.

With no further action, the bill died at the end of the 2004 legislative session.

EC Education Act and Comprehensive, Medically Accurate Sexuality Education Bills Die

Assembly Bill 979 and Senate Bill 544, both introduced in March 2004, would have enacted emergency contraception (EC) requirements for hospitals that provide emergency services. The bills also would have included the same provisions as Assembly Bill 387 with regard to sexuality education.

AB 979 and SB 544 died at the end of the 2004 legislative session.

Wyoming: The Wyoming legislature does not carry bills over from one session to the next. Both 2003 and 2004 bills are listed. Wyoming's legislative session is scheduled to end on May 5, 2004.

Resolution Recognizing Crisis Pregnancy Centers

House Joint Resolution 4, which "failed introduction" in February 2004, sought to recognize crisis pregnancy centers. In this resolution, crisis pregnancy centers' work on abstinence was recognized: "WHEREAS, many crisis pregnancy centers work to prevent unexpected pregnancies by teaching effective abstinence education in many venues, including in public schools." The resolution also encouraged Congress to "grant crisis pregnancy centers assistance for medical equipment and abstinence education in a manner that does not compromise the religious integrity of these organizations."

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